Robot – mentalist

Robot – mentalist

Algorithm which can help predict the future? To be more precise – just human movement, but it is still more, than we can do for ourselves.


The software created by the group of bioengineers from the University of Illinois at Chicago, can be used to power a “psychic robot” – thanks to that algorithm, device can predict human intended behavior. For what? To predict the way a person wanted to move, according to his intention even when there was a disturbance and no follow through. Machine using “psychic” algorithm can recognize the person’s intent and can help the person achieve what they want – for example take the mug from the table. Is sounds a little futuristic, but the software can provide controlling the machine just by intent – not by actions.

The best way to catch the idea is to imagine a stroke patient, who is unable to complete an action due to muscle spasms or tremors. The algorithm may make it possible for a “smart” prosthesis to discern the person’s intent and help them complete the task smoothly. It can be used in exoskeletons, artificial limbs, surgical robots and vehicles.

Lead author of the project is Dr. Justin Horowitz. To catch the sense of the software, Horowitz put an example of preventing cars from skidding off road after hitting a patch of ice:

The steering system could ‘know’ where it is you mean to go and control individual wheels to keep you on course, (…)This should be applicable to any application where a machine can react more quickly and/or accurately than the human controlling it.

First intent-controlled, robot-powered arm was presented at the conference Neuroscience 2015 in Chicago this week.

Source: inverse.com

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